The Adventures of Wrathgar - Volume I

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A little too close for comfort. The humor in Freakazoid! Due to the series being metafiction , much of the series was self-aware humor i. A typically strange running gag involves a repeated credit for "Weena Mercator as the Hopping Woman", though no such character appears in any episode. Her credit is usually preceded by a number of other fictional names and followed by a fictional director. The show also incorporated humor aimed at the then-newly founded WB Network , such as questioning the meaning of the initials "WB", e.

Cameo appearances were also a major element of the show's humor. At various times, Freakazoid!


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Cartoons such as Pinky and the Brain , Animaniacs and even an insinuation appearance of the Batman from Bruce Timm's animated version , which has a similar drawing style its concept of old movie-style title cards at the beginning of each episode was also replicated in Freakazoid! Portrayals of many celebrities including producer Steven Spielberg and guest appearances by such figures as Jack Valenti , Leonard Maltin and Mark Hamill as themselves were also commonplace. Norm Abram had an entire episode, "Normadeus", built around him. One original character, a bizarre-looking man named Emmitt Nervend, plays no role whatsoever other than enabling a Where's Waldo -esque hunt for his constant cameos complete with the number of his appearances announced in the closing credits.

One of the show's longest cameo appearances was when Wakko from Animaniacs and the Brain from Pinky and the Brain appeared in a scene in which they argue with Freakazoid over which of their shows is Steven Spielberg 's favorite, with Freakazoid arguing that his show was the favorite because "we got a memo" Tiny Toon Adventures was not represented in the discussion as it was on Nickelodeon at the time, while the others were on Kids' WB.

However, when the trio confronts Steven over the issue, he simply replies: "Who are you people? Timm came up with the name for the character naturally, as he recalled, "The name 'Freakazoid' just kind of jumped out of me, I don't even know where from. I said 'Oh, yeah, 'Freakazoid', that might be an interesting name. Timm originally created Freakazoid to be a serious "adventure show" with some comedic undertones.

It started out as an adventure show, but it ended up turning into more and more of a comedy show; every time we'd have a meeting with Steven, the concept would kinda [sic] change, and it kept leaning more and more towards zany comedy. It really started out almost like Spider-Man , on that level of, like, a teenage superhero. I don't have anything against that; I just don't have a flair for it, so I bailed—I just hung out here while my staff had to do the show. After Timm left the series, Tom Ruegger , who developed other Spielberg series Tiny Toon Adventures and Animaniacs , was brought in to redevelop the series Timm had created "from the ground up".

Ruegger then began writing stories for the series, and came up with a pile of very short segments.

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Spielberg liked what Ruegger had written, but wanted longer stories for the series as well. Ruegger then asked writers John McCann and Paul Rugg to come onto the series to write longer, more elaborate stories for the series and, according to Rugg, " Tom Ruegger said that Freakazoid had done poorly in ratings because the audience that the series gathered was older than the target audience.

Writer John McCann said that the timeslot of the series changed frequently: "They put it at eight o' clock in the morning, in the afternoon, they shifted it all around; we couldn't even find it, and we wrote the thing". Had there been, I'm telling you, we'd still be on the air today". In , Freakazoid!

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Bruce Timm said that the series still has a cult following of fans who ask him questions about the series whenever they meet him. According to Timm, the character's co-creator, he actually has a preference for the second season:. The second season was less Animaniacs. It was more Monty Python , it was much more surreal. It was less hip, topical in-jokes, and I thought that stuff was much funnier and much more unique.

The first season, to me, was just Animaniacs with a super-hero in it. Freakazoid never had his own comic book, but he did make a special guest crossover in issue 35 of the Animaniacs comic published by DC Comics. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the U. For other uses, see Freakazoid disambiguation.

This section does not cite any sources.

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Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. May Learn how and when to remove this template message. I mean, it probably would not have worked as a straight super-hero show. It was really neither fish nor fowl. It was such a weird idea that it probably needed to be a comedy more than an adventure show. Main article: List of Freakazoid! Steven Spielberg Presents Freakazoid: Season 1.

Warner Home Video. Top Animated Series. Retrieved 13 December Archived from the original on Retrieved Mike Allred Message Board. Archived from the original on July 28, Modern Masters Volume 3: Bruce Timm.

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Time Warner. TV Guide. Retrieved 28 May Animation portal Cartoon portal s portal. Warner Bros. What's New, Scooby-Doo? ThunderCats ThunderCats Roar. Haunted Holidays Scooby-Doo! Dracula Scooby-Doo! Pirates Ahoy! Also, writers John P. McCann and Paul Rugg who played Freakazoid added voices themselves. Casting for the show had been difficult for the Freakazoid!

Then they played it for Steven Spielberg and he said 'Yep! Fine, sure, great,' and then I panicked The music for Freakazoid! Stone won a Daytime Emmy with lyricist and senior producer Tom Ruegger for the main title song in Cartoonist Mike Allred has criticized the show and its lead character as plagiarism of his comic book Madman , [5] asserting that the title characters share several personality traits, and wear similar costumes featuring a chest emblem including an exclamation mark.

During the short run of the show, Allred remained relatively silent on the subject, but in , he responded to a question about the show on the message board of his official website:. Stupidly, I was flattered; happy to inspire anything. But when the show came out, with no acknowledgement or credit or any kind of compensation, I slowly became annoyed as everyone and their uncle confronted me with "there's this cartoon that's ripping off Madman " and "you oughta sue".

I simply wrote a friendly letter to [show producer] Steven Spielberg telling him his production was a direct lift of my creation, I had no intention of creating ripples, I just wanted him to know that I knew. No one replied, which is fine.


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And to be honest, Madman is an amalgam of a half a dozen other influences. So who am I to complain the exclamation mark on the chest still kinda urks [sic] me a little though. A little too close for comfort. The humor in Freakazoid! Due to the series being metafiction , much of the series was self-aware humor i. A typically strange running gag involves a repeated credit for "Weena Mercator as the Hopping Woman", though no such character appears in any episode. Her credit is usually preceded by a number of other fictional names and followed by a fictional director. The show also incorporated humor aimed at the then-newly founded WB Network , such as questioning the meaning of the initials "WB", e.

Cameo appearances were also a major element of the show's humor. At various times, Freakazoid! Cartoons such as Pinky and the Brain , Animaniacs and even an insinuation appearance of the Batman from Bruce Timm's animated version , which has a similar drawing style its concept of old movie-style title cards at the beginning of each episode was also replicated in Freakazoid!

Portrayals of many celebrities including producer Steven Spielberg and guest appearances by such figures as Jack Valenti , Leonard Maltin and Mark Hamill as themselves were also commonplace. Norm Abram had an entire episode, "Normadeus", built around him. One original character, a bizarre-looking man named Emmitt Nervend, plays no role whatsoever other than enabling a Where's Waldo -esque hunt for his constant cameos complete with the number of his appearances announced in the closing credits. One of the show's longest cameo appearances was when Wakko from Animaniacs and the Brain from Pinky and the Brain appeared in a scene in which they argue with Freakazoid over which of their shows is Steven Spielberg 's favorite, with Freakazoid arguing that his show was the favorite because "we got a memo" Tiny Toon Adventures was not represented in the discussion as it was on Nickelodeon at the time, while the others were on Kids' WB.

However, when the trio confronts Steven over the issue, he simply replies: "Who are you people? Timm came up with the name for the character naturally, as he recalled, "The name 'Freakazoid' just kind of jumped out of me, I don't even know where from.

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I said 'Oh, yeah, 'Freakazoid', that might be an interesting name. Timm originally created Freakazoid to be a serious "adventure show" with some comedic undertones. It started out as an adventure show, but it ended up turning into more and more of a comedy show; every time we'd have a meeting with Steven, the concept would kinda [sic] change, and it kept leaning more and more towards zany comedy.

It really started out almost like Spider-Man , on that level of, like, a teenage superhero. I don't have anything against that; I just don't have a flair for it, so I bailed—I just hung out here while my staff had to do the show. After Timm left the series, Tom Ruegger , who developed other Spielberg series Tiny Toon Adventures and Animaniacs , was brought in to redevelop the series Timm had created "from the ground up".

Ruegger then began writing stories for the series, and came up with a pile of very short segments. Spielberg liked what Ruegger had written, but wanted longer stories for the series as well.